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ITBP team to ski down Everest

To mark its golden jubilee year, the Indo-Tibetan Border Police hopes to create a world record of sorts by sending a team of experienced mountaineers to ski down Mount Everest in the coming months. The ITBP Mountaineering and Skiing Expedition was flagged off by Delhi’s Lieutenant-Governor Tejendra Khanna here on Friday.

ITBP Director-General Ranjit Sinha showing world-class equipment to Delhi’s Lieutenant-Governor Tejendra Khanna at the flagging-off ceremony of the skiing expedition to Everest at ITBP headquarters in New Delhi on Friday. Expedition leader Commandant Prem Singh looks on. Photo: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

World-class equipment and clothing has been procured by the ITBP for the expedition, including special helmet video mounted cameras to record the process of skiing down.

The ITBP was constituted in 1962 and began mountaineering in 1964. Its mountaineers have held records of scaling Mount Everest six times. Its skiers have skied down from peaks like Mt. Kamet (25,447 feet), Mt. Abigamin (24,130 ft) and Mt. Stoke Kangri (20,077 ft) in the past.

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2012 in Mountaineering

 

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Dodi Tal – Darwa Top – Dayara Bugyal Circuit Trek

Yesterday Mr. Kannan messaged me about the alpine style trek for this circuit and immediately I said yes!!

Even I was thinking of doing a solo trek ( without the help of porters or guides) but couldn’t plan it.

The Itinerary which is fixed by Kannan is like this

Day 0 (April 30): Dehradum -> Uttarkashi -> Barsu; stay at GMVN, Barsu
Day 1: Barsu -> Barnala Bugyal (6 km, 4hrs) -> Dayara Bugyal (6 km, 2.5 hrs) ; camp at Dayara
Day 2: Dayara Bugyal -> Nimdhar (16km, 6hrs); camp at Nimdhar
Day 3: Nimdhar -> Dodigad crossing -> Manjhi ; camp at Manjhi
Day 4: Manjhi -> Dodital (5km, ?hrs); camp at Dodital
Day 5: Dodital -> Darwatop (4115m) -> Seema (18km, 7hrs); camp at Seema
Day 6: Seema -> Hanuman Chatti (13km, 5hrs); stay in a hotel at Hanuman Chatti
Day 7: trek to yamunotri

I have starting my research for the trek…I have done good amount of trekking in Uttarakhand but this route is kind of new, very few people go for this except hardcore adventurers. Lets see if I can make this a popular  or not!!

Dayara Bugyal (Bugyal means meadows)

Image

This is going to be long awaited photography trip for me!!

 
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Posted by on April 6, 2012 in Travel, Trekking

 

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Never Give Up – Everything is Mind

When I was doing my Basic Mountaineering Course in HMI Darjelling there was one instructor Mr. Bhutia. We used to call him Bhutia Sir – extremely talented and a very good teacher. Whenever he used to teach us he used to repeat these words !!

  • Everything is Mind – u know Everything is Mind
  • If you can do it here in this part of Himalayas you will run in others
During my entire course these words help me a lot!!

This pic which I came across (most famous pic on twitter for this week) while reading something on net reminds of everything what Norbu Sir said!!

Dont Give up

Dont Give up

This is one example which proves that everything is mind!!  The other example when I went for Stok Kangri Expedition in Leh Ladakh, India. This gentleman in the pic inspired me a lot..he was with us during the trek and also on the summit of Stok Kangri (6153 Metres).

Gentleman in the Red Jacket

While trekking we were sitting and their group crossed us!!

http://stokkangritrek.net/

While trekking – Approaching the Basecamp!!

And On the Summit of Stok Kangri Trek !! He is there with us!!

stok kangri Trek

On the Summit of Stok Kangri

Obstacles or blocks or excuse are nothing but creation of our mind !! I think

If they can , We can and You can do 

 
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Posted by on March 29, 2012 in Adventure, Mountaineering, Travel

 

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Switzerland of Uttarakhand Chopta or Trek Deoriatal – Chopta – Tungnath – Chandrashila

Chopta is a picturesque hamlet which is still unexplored by travelers. Chopta is the commencement point of the trek to Tungnath – 3rd Kedar. Another 1.5 km trek from Tungnath leads to Chandrashila (4000mts above sea level) which offers a splendid view of snow clad Himalayan peaks including Nanda Devi, Trishul and Chaukhamba stretched widely. If some one want more can do a Deorital to Chadrashila trek which will we super delight for beginners.

Chukhamba and Deoria Tal

Chaukhama Mountain and Deoria Tal, Chopta

Chopta itself offers splendid views of the imposing Himalayan range including Trishul, Nanda Devi and Chaukhamba. It is located at an elevation of 2680mts above sea level. Chopta is rich in varied flora and fauna. Chopta is situated amidst thick forest of pine, deodar and rhododendrons.

Tungnath Temple Chopta

Tungnath Temple Chopta

To reach Chopta take a train Ndls Ddn Ac Exp (12205) from Delhi to Haridwar and from Haridwar take a shared taxi, hire cab or take a bus to Ukhimath. These bus taxi take around 8 to 10 hours to reach Ukhimath and from Ukhimath Chopta is is easily accessible and 37KMs. It is located on the road connecting Gopeshwar with Guptkashi. Wake up with cool salubrious breeze and chirping of birds in Chopta. The morning view from Chopta is invigorating when the crimson rays of sun kisses the snow laden Himalayas. Carry light woolens in summers and heavy woolens in winters while planning a visit to Chopta. Hotel in Chopta provides standard accommodation facilities at affordable prices.

Chopta, Tungnath and Chandrashila are covered with snow during winters. If you visit the place during Dec-Feb, you may witness snowfall and enjoy trekking in snow.

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2012 in Adventure, Photography, Travel

 

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Pune – City’s Everest expedition to begin on March 16

A team of 20 mountaineers of the Giripremi mountaineering club will embark on the Pune Everest 2012 expedition to scale the world’s highest peak on March 16. It is the fifth civilian expedition from the country and the first wherein 20 mountaineers from the same city are participating in an expedition to Everest, claimed team members on Tuesday.

Mighty Everest

Leader of the expedition Umesh Zirpe who is a Tax Consultant by profession and mountaineer by passion. The team is currently is undergoing physical and mental preparations for last 15 months. President Pratibha Patil will hand over the national flag to the team at Delhi, after which they will proceed to Kathmandu.

I think the success of this expedition will be very helpful in promoting the mountaineering and other adventure sports because there are very few civilian expeditions were planned for the mighty Mount Everest due to high cost for such expedition. The total budget for this expedition is INR 3.15 CR (0.7 Mn USD) and it is being collected from over 23000 donors… A major part of fund has come from individual donors apart from the funds from business and corporate houses.

Giripremi's Pune Everest Expedition 2012

 
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Posted by on March 14, 2012 in Adventure, Mountaineering, Travel

 

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Adventure tourism reaches a new high

Three years ago, Preeti Ralhan, a 41-year-old homemaker from Gurgaon, was holidaying in Chiang Mai, Thailand, with her family. While they had no plans for adventure, their guide insisted they try a 5-km zip line tour atop the rainforest. “Suspended from cables, zipping past trees and cliffs, we had the time of our lives,” says Ralhan.

They wanted to zip-line again, but didn’t want to go all the way to Thailand. And then, they heard of Flying Fox, a service that offers zip-lining tours in Neemrana, 100 km from Delhi. So, last month, the family drove to the heritage town for a zip-lining tour that cost just Rs 1,500 per person. “Three years ago, we thought this was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. But now, we know we can afford to do it twice a year,” says Ralhan. She adds that the Neemrana zip line was more picturesque than the Chiang Mai one because of the view of the heritage fort and the rocky terrain around it.

If you are an adventure junkie, you needn’t pack your bags and take a flight out of India. You can now go zipping at Neemrana, Jodhpur and Kikar Lodge near Chandigarh, or scuba diving off Andaman and Nicobar, Lakshadweep, Goa and at Angria Bank in Maharashtra; paragliding at various places in Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal and Rajasthan; hot-air-balloon-riding in Rajasthan; parasailing in Haryana, mountain biking at Jalori Pass in Himachal, Manali and Narkanda, heli-skiing in Kashmir, or skiing in Manali.

Even though adventure tourism has been around for at least a decade, lately, it has seen several new companies offering tours in offbeat sports like sky diving, zip lining, and heli-skiing to consumers that include corporate managers, youngsters and families. Mukul Ronak Das, CEO of Bangalore-based Waltair Escapade Thrills, the company that launched commercial sky diving for the first time in India in October 2011 (in Madhya Pradesh, followed by Maharashtra late last year and Punjab in February), says that five years ago, adventure sports contributed not more than 35-40 per cent to the tourism revenue, and most of it came from conventional sports such as skiing and rafting. Now, new and sophisticated sports such as sky diving, heli-skiing, and zip lining are also doing well. And the government realises the potential of promoting the country as an adventure destination. “Out of the 48-second recent Incredible India ad on TV, 60 per cent time is devoted to snapshots of adventure activities,” says Das.

While there were already around 35,000-40,000 big and small adventure operators in India, the last six months have seen them getting more organised and professionally managed. Flying Fox, which began in 2007 in Neemrana, has, over the years, spread to Jodhpur and Chandigarh. Delhi-based Wanderlust Camps and Resorts, which claims to be “the first company to bring bungee jumping to India (in 1999), hot air ballooning in 1989 and sky-walking in 2005” and is run by ex-Army officer Captain SK Yadav, has been organising camps for companies and now even families. Their camps are priced between Rs 999 and Rs 1,999 per person per night. “Adventure activities were first brought into the Indian corporate culture as part of team-building exercises. They used activities, such as valley crossing and flying fox, which the army uses to train its officers and jawans,” says Yadav. One of the most unique activities they have organised so far is sky walking. Participants were harnessed and made to walk vertically on the exteriors of some tall office buildings in Gurgaon.

Trained adventure professionals from abroad have also set up shop in India. India’s first 83-metre-high bungee jump, in Rishi-kesh, has been designed and is run by a team of bungee experts from New Zealand, and the Flying Fox zip lining tours are run by two British nationals. “Since these are not native adventure activities, you need to bring in foreign skills because there’s no domestic expertise to draw upon,” says Flying Fox Asia director Richard McCullum.

Obviously, commercial interests are driving the adrenaline boom in India. ­Manmeet Ahluwalia, marketing head at ­travel portal expedia.co.in, says, “Indians travel overseas a lot, and consume a lot of adventure there. Even foreign tourists, who come to India mainly for cultural and spiritual consumption, end up indulging in adventure activities here, especially in Manali and Ladakh.”

Ajeet Bajaj, the first Indian to have scaled both the North and the South Pole, and who runs one of India’s oldest adventure tour companies, Snow Leopard Adventures, agrees: “There are no exact figures but estimates say that there are no less than two million adventure consumers in India every year — domestic as well as foreign.” Vikas Arora, administrator, Adventure Tour Operators Association of India, pegs that number to be increasing at a rate of 20-25 per cent annually, thanks to “corporate getaways and family tourism fuelling the demand.”

Women, he says, are big drivers of adventure tourism. “More than 25 per cent of adventure travellers are women in the 35-60 age group,” says Arora. Chandigarh-based Kanika Khanna and her four college friends, for example, celebrated their graduation by bungee-jumping in Rishikesh, offered by Jumpin Heights, which also organises an 83-metre-high swing and a 1-km-long zip line. “The first sight of that sky-high platform from where I was supposed to jump off , even though the coach had harnessed me well, gave me butterflies in the stomach. I almost chickened out but when I saw another girl my age jumping off the platform without any inhibition, I took heart and gave it a shot. The next day, we took the combo package and enjoyed all three activities in one day for Rs 4,000 per person,” she recalls.

India’s vast terrain makes it an ideal adventure spot. Says Das, “We have the mountains with snow-clad peaks, beaches and coasts, rocks and plains — each state has something to offer,” he says.

The topography apart, affordability lures domestic tourists. Arup Bhowmick, a 32-year-old investment banker from Delhi, went scuba diving in Goa last May, after his “very expensive” adventures abroad, including bungee jumping in Poland and scuba diving in Mala in 2008, and sky diving in California in 2010. “I wouldn’t say that the Goa experience was better than Malaysia — the marine life is equally divine at both places, but we saved a lot of time and money. My Goa trip cost just 25 per cent of my Malaysia one,” he say

Sky Walking in Gurgaon – Indian Express.

http://www.renokadventures.com

 

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How to Dress in Layers for Upcoming Trekking in Summers

Changuch Peak in the Clouds and Our BasecampComfortable Outdoors

Comfortable Outdoors

Layering is the tried and tested method for comfortable outdoors by Mountaineers for long time. The beauty of this simple concept is that it allows you to make quick adjustments based on your activity level and changes in the weather.

So, lets understand what exactly layering for comfortable outdoors really means. While wearing clothes for outdoors they are used in three basic layers

1. Base Layer – near to the skin, manages moisture

2. Insulation Layer – protects from cold

3 Shell or Outer Layer – protects from Wind or Rain

Base Layer:

This Layer is next to your skin and helps in regulate your body temperature by moving perspiration away from your body. Keeping dry is important for maintaining a cool body temperature in the summer and avoiding hypothermia in the winter. If you have ever used a cotton T under your rain cover while hiking or trekking, you will get wet not from outside but from inside.

Base Layer

Base Layer

Cotton is not the good material for this clothing layer instead synthetic fabrics like MTS, Capilene, PowerDry and CoolMax polyester or Silk.

 Insulation Layer – protects from cold

The insulating layer helps you retain heat by trapping air close to your body. Fleece vests, jackets and tights are classic examples of insulation ideal for outdoor activities and for more extreme conditions feather jackets are most appropriate. Down has a very good warmth:weight ratio, and can be packed down (squeezed) to take very little room but are very costly.

They not only trap air but are also made with moisture transferring fibers to help keep you dry.

Shell or Outer Layer – protects from Wind or Rain

The outermost clothes are called the shell layer, they block wind or water and have good mechanical strength. Ideally the shell layer clothes are breathable i.e they lets moisture through to the outside while not letting wind and water pass through from the outside to the inside.

Gore Tex

Gore Tex is extensively used for outer layer and it is Waterproof and breathable made of the very strong fabrics. It is founded by W. L. Gore & Associates and they are best known for their this product which is used in various world leading brands.

During Stok Kangri (6153Mts) Expedition I used The North Face – GoreTex Jacket
 

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